Fuji’s Golden History: Super GT on Golden Week

 

It’s the second-biggest race of the Super GT calendar, and it happens during one of Japan’s biggest holiday celebrations. The Fuji 500 Kilometer race, a tradition of the Golden Week holidays for over twenty years, will run exactly one week from today – on a Wednesday, May 4.

There are motor races that are so deeply synonymous with a holiday in North America: Memorial Day has both the Indianapolis 500 and the Coca-Cola/World 600 at Charlotte, American Independence Day is the season of the Coke Zero/Firecracker 400 at Daytona, and Labor Day has, for the better part of 65 years, been linked to the Southern 500 at Darlington. And the ties to the Fuji 500km and the Golden Week holiday are no different.

Specifically, it’s the date of May 4, a date that for many years fell between two official holidays and was, in itself, declared a holiday. For most of the last twenty-two years, the Fuji 500km has been held on this date – no matter what day of the week it occurs.

If the Suzuka 1000km at the end of August is like the Daytona 500, or the Bathurst 1000, then the Fuji 500km could be considered analogous to the Southern 500, or the Clipsal 500 at Adelaide – the second-biggest race on the calendar, illuminating with a prestige and pedigree that has made it a perennial fixture on the Super GT calendar. Continue reading “Fuji’s Golden History: Super GT on Golden Week”

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Juichi Wakisaka: A look back on a legend

Juichi Wakisaka retired from driving on Wednesday, bringing a legendary career to a close.

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Image Credit – © Toyota Motor Corporation

Juichi Wakisaka announced his retirement from Super GT’s premier category of racing during Toyota Gazoo Racing’s 2016 motorsport press conference, bringing one of the most sensational careers in racing to a close.

Wakisaka’s retirement will likely not be reflected upon to the same degree as that of another recently retired Toyota sports car legend, Alexander Wurz. He never got the chance to test his skill in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, or in the World Endurance Championship or any of its forerunners. He never got to compete in Formula 1. In fact, he rarely competed outside of his native Japan, save for his fairly recent efforts in the Nürburgring 24 Hour race with Gazoo Racing.

But to everyone in the Toyota racing family, his home for the last fifteen years, he is a respected, revered legend, amongst his fellow drivers, amongst the mechanics and engineers who’ve worked with him over a career that spanned twenty-one years in total since graduating from karting in 1995, and amongst fans, young and old, who will so dearly miss him as a competitive driver. Continue reading “Juichi Wakisaka: A look back on a legend”